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Fig Jam Recipe

There is nothing like homemade jam. And with the abundance of fresh figs, I decided to share a delicious Fig Jam Recipe for you to try.

Glass jar filled with dark fig jam.

HOMEMADE FIG JAM RECIPE

Wood board, black plate with bread with fig jam, fresh figs and a small jar with jam.

Figs

To make jam, you can use fresh or dried figs. There are many different varieties of figs, which you use to make fig jam is up to you. However, just to mention, black figs are known for their sweetness and are great for eating and making jam.

And since that’s what I found at a local market, I used black figs to make the jam (step 1). Wash the figs, remove stems, and cut them in half (steps 2-4).

Fresh figs in a crate.

Lemon Peel and Lemon Juice

I like to use lemon juice when making Fig Jam. Why do you use lemon juice and lemon peel in the fig jam recipe? Figs are considered low acid fruits and they need extra help to reach a gel-like consistency.

Lemons are naturally packed with pectin, and adding lemon juice introduces natural pectin that aids in the setting of the jam, without the use of store-bought pectin. Honestly, I’ve never been a fan of store-bought pectin. I much rather use another form of acid when making jam from low acid fruits. You can use lemons, sour oranges, limes, and even citric acid in powder form.

To get the most out of the lemon I also used lemon peel without the white pith, along with lemon juice to marinade the figs. Use four large lemons or 5-6 smaller ones. Peel the yellow skin with a potato peeler. Try to peel as much of the yellow skin as possible.

Lemon peel, peeled lemon and a blue peeler on a granite countertop.

It’s best to use freshly squeezed lemon juice. I don’t recommend using lemon juice substitutes.

Mesh sieve with lemon pulp and seed and lemon juice in a white bowl.

Macerate Figs

  • While you don’t have to macerate the fruit, I highly recommend it. When you toss fruit with sugar and let it rest, sugar starts to break down the fruit, without actually cooking it and without the loss of the fresh taste.
  • Added sugar also draws out the natural sugars from the figs, intensifying their flavor. I macerate figs overnight in a syrup made from lemon juice, lemon peel, sugar, and honey.

TIP: You can also use liqueur to macerate fruit.

Pour washed and cut in half figs into a large bowl, add lemon juice, sugar, and honey and stir well. Cover with a kitchen towel and let macerate overnight or for 8-10 hours (steps 1-6).

Cut up fresh figs in a stainless steel bowl, with lemon zest, honey and sugar.

Macerated figs have a wonderful aroma and flavor. After several hours you’ll notice figs are now submerged in their natural juices, released as a result of sugar working its magic (step 2).

Marinated figs in a bowl.

Once you are ready to cook the macerated figs, remove the lemon peel and toss it.

Hand picking lemon peel from the marinated fruit.

Food Mill and Food Processor

There are different types of jams you can prepare. I wanted to make a smooth, thick jam that I can use as filling for my Fig Newtown Cookies.

If you prefer a jam with fruit chunks, and without the skins, I suggest you use a food mill to remove the skins.

Process macerated figs in a blender or a food processor (steps 1-6).

Blender with fruit puree.

Cook Fig Jam

Pour fig puree into a large pot and bring mixture to boil. Then reduce the heat and cook the fig puree over medium heat, stirring occasionally. Simmer fruit puree for about an hour, then once it starts to thicken, stir frequently to prevent scorching.

Cook jam until it reaches the gel stage (220F). If you have a candy thermometer you can use it. If you don’t have a candy thermometer there are a few ways you can test if your jam is ready. Read the section below to learn about these tests.

Jam in a large stainless steel pot on a stove top.

TIP: Cover the pot with a simmering jam with a splatter shield. Jam, when simmering it’s very hot and it can splatter. I use a splatter shield to protect myself and the surrounding surfaces from stains.

Pot covered with a splatter shield.

How can you tell jam is ready?

  • Use a thermometer, and cook the jam until it reaches 220F. If you don’t have a candy thermometer, you can use these simple tests below to determine if your jam is ready.
  • Chill a small plate for 2 minutes in the freezer, then take a spoonful of hot jam and drop it onto a chilled plate, return it to the freezer for 5 minutes. Touch the jam with your finger, if it wrinkles and feels gel-like, it’s ready. If it doesn’t you need to keep cooking it and test it every 5-10 minutes.
  • If you prefer thicker jam, cook it longer but don’t overcook. I also use this simple test: I run a spatula through the jam, if it takes 10 seconds or longer for the separation line to disappear it’s ready.
  • Chill a spoon in the freezer for 2 minutes. Dip a cold metal spoon into the boiling jam. Turn the spoon horizontally. If you see jam is falling off the spoon not in drops but as a “sheet” of jam, then it’s ready.
Spoon with cooked jam.

Red Wine Reduction

To boost the flavors of my fig jam I decided to add an easy-to-make red wine reduction.

Pour red wine into a pot, add brown sugar, and stir well. Bring to boil and then reduce to simmer and cook for 30-40 minutes (steps 1-4). As red wine starts to thicken, you need to stir it more frequently to prevent scorching. Cook the wine with sugar until reduced to about 1/3 cup to 1/2 cup. Red wine reduction should have a syrupy consistency (steps 5-6).

Pot with red wine reduction.

Fig Jam with Red Wine Reduction

Pour red wine reduction into fig jam and cook until jam reached the gel stage.

Pouring red wine reduction into jam.

Can Fig Jam be Frozen?

Yes, you can freeze fig jam for up to 3 months. Or can fig jam in a water bath. The canned jam will last up to 2-3 years if stored properly.

How Long Does Fig Jam Last?

My fig jam lasts for up to a month in the fridge and for 3 months in the freezer.

Can I use This Fig Jam to make Fig Newtons?

Yes, I used it to make Fig Newtons all the time.

How to Use Fig Jam?

Fig jam is great as a spread over a toast or as a filling for cookies. You can pair it with cheese and ham for delicious fig appetizers.

Which Cheese goes with Fig Jam?

I love it with brie and goat cheese but really it pairs nicely with so many cheeses.

Jar with jam o a wood board along side fresh cut figs.
Fig Jam Recipe
Prep Time
10 mins
Cook Time
3 hrs
 

Recipe for homemade Fig Jam without pectin.

Makes about 5 cups.

Serving size 1/4 cup.

Course: Appetizer, Breakfast, Candy, Snack, Spreads
Cuisine: American, Italian
Keyword: fig jam, fig jam recipe, fig jam without pectin, homemade fig jam, how tomake fig jam
Servings: 20 servings
Hanielas.com: Hani
Ingredients
FIG JAM RECIPE
Fig Puree
  • 4.5 pounds fresh figs (2 kilograms)
  • 3/4 cup freshly squezed lemon juice
  • 1 cup granulated sugar (200grams)
  • 1 cup honey (340grams)
  • lemon peel without white part from 4 large lemons
Red Wine Reduction
  • 25.4 fl oz. (fluid ounce) red wine, 750ml (milliliters)
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar, packed (107grams)
Instructions
FIG JAM RECIPE
Fig Puree
  1. Wash figs (4.5 lb, 2kg), remove the stems and cut figs in half. Place figs into a large bowl and pour lemon juice (3/4 cup), honey (1 cup, 340grams), sugar (1 cup, 200grams), and lemon peel without lemon pith (from 4 large lemons) over the figs. Stir well. Cover with a kitchen towel and let marinade for 8 – 10 hours.

  2. Remove the lemon peel. Process marinated figs in the blender or food processor until smooth.

  3. Pour fig puree into a pot. Bring mixture to boil and simmer the fig puree over medium heat, stirring occasionally. Simmer puree for about an hour, then once it starts to thicken, stir frequently to prevent scorching.

    Cook jam until it reaches the gel stage (220F). If you have a candy thermometer you can use it.

    How can you tell jam is ready? You can do a simple test. Chill a small plate for 2 minutes in the freezer, then take a spoonful of hot jam and drop it onto a chilled plate, return it to the freezer for 5 minutes. Touch the jam with your finger, if it wrinkles and feels gel-like, it’s ready. If it doesn’t you need to keep cooking it and test it every 5-10 minutes.

    If you prefer thicker jam, cook it longer but don't overcook. I also use this simple test: I run a spatula through the jam, if it takes 10 seconds or longer for the separation line to disappear it's ready.

  4. If using, in this step you can add red wine reduction. Pour red wine reduction into the jam, stir well and cook till the jam passes the gel test. A few minutes usually.

Red Wine Reduction
  1. Pour red wine (25.4 fl.oz, 750ml) into a pot, and add brown sugar (1/2cup packed, 107grams). Stir well and bring to boil, reduce to simmer, and cook for about 30-40 minutes. Stirring occasionally.

    Red wine sauce will start to thicken, it will be reduced in volume. Continue cooking, stirring frequently, it will start to take on a syrup-like consistency. Be careful not to burn it. Once ready it should coat the back of the spoon.

Recipe Notes
  • Can fig jam be frozen? – Yes, up to 3 months,
  • How long does fig jam last? – my fig jam lasts up to a month in the fridge and up to 3 months in the freezer. 
  • How to can fig jam? – I use a water bath.  Canned jam lasts for up to 2 years if stored properly.
  • When to use fig jam? – I love using homemade fig jam to make Fig Newtowns Cookies. You can spread a little jam on toast. Pair it with brie or goat cheese for delicious appetizers.
  • Can I use this fig jam to make fig newtons? – Yes, absolutely, I do it all the time. Try my recipe for homemade Fig Newton Cookies.

Did you make this recipe? Tag @hanielas on Instagram and hashtag it #hanielas

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